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the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and society's going to be then you are able to tell what are the confines in which this reality will have to live in the country? so what we have seen now in the global phenomena is everywhere from sweden to america and canada to i ran to singapore is people choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in human history that this is happen voluntarily on a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: well how do we know that fertility is -- that is how is it measured and are we t
with all these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost certainly the first several decades people back in washington were saying what have we done here? we conquered this land but we don't understand it and we can't govern it. we should just give it all back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence and slavery. there was the hostagetaking and it was just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. so that is part to. part three is really about carson's role in the conquest of the novel hope people and everything he did with that. is a sort of the final act of his long career and that's probably what he is best known for, the sort of a scorched earth campaign that he led into nobilo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved land and this great experiment that went on to try to force the novel hope to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living on these reservations on the border of texas. it's a big sprawling book that has many parts
. religion does well. this wall behind the paperback fiction combat rolls out here on a steady basis. both for locals and visitors who want something light to read. the author breakfast meats here all winter long before the metropolitan opera, which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. there is a breakfast and a lecture here. we do a lot with music and arts. the history of santa fe is vivid with two major cultures. native american, hispanic, and the anglo. now, that is actually oversimplifying things, but each one carries such a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today. we do events here. we boast the best spanish colonial art market. we sell books at the indian market, which is the largest art market in the world. for many years we have sold looks in the spanish market. again, the largest hispanic market in the world. we are falling all over each other but the sharing and the support that is universal makes it such a wonderfully exciting place to be. >> in the very early day, sa
religion soaring today. let's head to nicole on the floor of the new york stock exchange. looking very healthy for the stock. nicole: that's right. the stock is soaring today. it's up over 20% when you take a look at it. true religion jeans, right? they are probably $200 a pair. they come out with their numbers. there are some analyst calls and some options for strategic review. i think that's what's really giving this company a boost. let's break it down. you did have bb&t put a buy rating on it. came out with fourth quarter profit which dropped some, but the sales beat the street. and then of course back in october and once again it has resurfaced that execs are saying that a strategic review by a special committee is continuing. so we will see what that means for the company ultimately. i went outside liz tried to bring you right to the store here on wall street give you a little scene of the jeans and such, but it certainly is a winner today. back to you. liz: okay, thank you. there's a major obstacle in the justice department insider trading investigation of steve cohen. charlie g
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
on tolerance, justice and where no discrimination based on religion, gender or ethnicity can be accepted. so, president, i'm very pleased to see that your government is defending marriage for all. [applause] >> translator: that is also our stance on the issue. change is afoot in france, president, but also in europe. we need to continue in order to create a fairer social europe, one that shows solidarity and one which is stronger on the global stage. your role is crucial, president. do not give in to the vision of a single market that mr. cameron sees. that's not our vision of europe. quite the contrary, in fact. you need to say to mrs. merkel, mr. president: angela, eisenhower, brant, schmidt, cole, all of these men had a vision of europe. help me to achieve our vision of europe. you've said that you would recreate the french vision when you were elected, and now in the council you can help breathe life back into the european vision. thank you. [applause] [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: thank you very much, indeed. now on behalf of the united liberals and -- [inaudible] displt th
in a city like this, there are thousands of things that drive us apart. politics, ideology and even religion. we come together in the spirit of jesus who told us to love one another and to treat others as we want to be treated and love god with all of your heart, soul, mind and strength. it would be a better world if we just listen to it. >> as you look around the world i had a stand that you are sharing this meal. all 50 states, presidents, heads of state, leaders of all kind through prayer we believe that god has brought us together for a reason. as you listen closely to the program, try to figure out what god is saying to you. as you have heard this is hosted by the members of the house and senate and i would ask all of the members of the house and senate to stand at this time. with .. [applause] thank you. thank you. and now i'd like to introduce the head table that will lead us through this experience. i'll start on my right. today you can say that you ate breakfast with the president and as a gold metalist. at the end of the program, it will be offered by olympics champion gabriel doug
the swamp and what it does, it is radicalizing people that are standing up against militants using religion as a mobilizing force. so i think that drones as an instrument may have had some secrecy in terms of position, but -- and it's like saying, well, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in, we use our own to run anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so drones are now -- we don't see them as productive at all. >> what do you tell the germ's staff -- what do you tell the staff -- >> you need to be a fly on that committee wall. >> jonathan. >> i think we are all. on the same page. members of the general's staff on where the future of this -- pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door also. and in any case, you know that al qaeda is the whole al qaeda high valleys is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts. and that's something this administrati
religions. unquote. the mission statement i just quoted translates into a comprehensive effort to penetrate to influence, otherwise subvert our american civil society. a form of government, a governing institutions. that explanatory memorandum i just quoted from was written on may 19, 1991, by a top muslim brotherhood operative, -- operative. now, though the justice department has established in federal court during the holy land foundation trials in dallas texas, that the groups identified by the muslim brotherhood in their memo are, quote, their organizations, end quote, a number of them and their successors have been treated by the obama administration as key interlock tors -- interlocutories in dealing with jihad. and believes in this administration, believe that these muslim brotherhood front organizations are legitimate representatives of the muslim -american community. they have enabled the muslim brotherhood to recruit and to show others, look, we are the ones that the white house trusts. we could call the white house. we can call and tell them we have -- there are three people who
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agree to those values and the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up to them. it's not always easy in the have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or to penicillin continue to stand up for them. on the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest from economic interest in moral interest and we have to continue to do that. but as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever, more agile and wish i had do that. for example are adtran, -- there are those who estimate that maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. but we try to do is say briefly mention is to get in there with them, undermine them and we've got them. it is something i did quite well in the cold war. the wife done this job, the more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some mono
of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values in the declaration, universal declaration of human rights and will stand up for them. it's not always easy and we have to pick our time. we can't be shortsighted or did, but will continue to stand up for them. and the fundamental first level, we do what we do because it's in our security interest, economic interests in more interests and we have to continue to do that. but then as you go to the second level, how you adapt that to the world that today requires us to be more clever, more agile and were trying to do that. for example, countering violent extremism, does this to me there are maybe 50,000 violent homicidal extremists in the world, but they are able to maximize their impact and messaging today and are not and what we try to do is to get in there with him, to undermine non-and to rebut them. to dissent than we did quite well in the cold war. the more i've done this job, the more i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. no, we don't have some monolithic communist soviet union. but we
and exclusion from any of the activities of the state? guest: i am not the kind of islamic or religion scholar, but as a muslim i would say what is against humanity is against -- is not accepted by me as a muslim and i us as muslims in afghanistan. we do have our own definition islam and democracy, but i think it is not the way that was somehow understood in general here. host: the world press freedom index that we showed earlier showed the united states 32nd and afghanistan 128. i want to take that question and ask that about afghanistan. who is restricting the press? guest: the problems we're facing in afghanistan when i am saying "we" it means media people and media community. inside the government of afghanistan sometimes, the people who are fighting with the government, taliban, for example, and some local governments across the country, these are the three main barriers that we are facing with all that we have the constitution, the article 34 is just granting access free media and freedom of information. the article 50 is granting access to information. all of the media [indiscernible] u
people standing up against militants and terrorists, using a religion, for instead as a mobilizing force. i think that charles is an instrument have had some efficacy in terms of precision. it's like saying, you know, we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come in. we use our road to an anti-terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. so you know, we don't see them as part of it at all. [inaudible] >> excuse me? [inaudible] >> you need to be a very big five on that committee will. but i think we are all in the same page now. members of the staff found where the future of this size. pakistan has to take ownership of absolutely all of them to be sustainable and be seen as legitimate in the eyes of ip hole. you know, there's been a lot of churn strikes next-door also. and in any case, you know the whole al qaeda is pretty much through our cooperation and joint efforts pretty much degraded. that said the administration will agree to also. >> thank you very much. you talk about the process in afghanistan being led. president karzai presents a pakistan and un
other's religion. just before the bell rang, one of the boxers made the sign of the cross. the rabbi nudged the priest and said, what does that mean? the priest said it doesn't mean a darn thing if you can't fight. [laughter] we bless ourselves with the hope that everything will be okay in this country. but very frankly, it won't mean a thing unless you're willing to fight for it. so my message to you, to the students in this audience, but it doesn't mean a thing if you are not willing to fight for the american dream. the dream that my parents had. the dream of giving our children a better life. the dream of maintaining a government for the people. that torch of duty is now passing to a new generation. with that passes the responsibility to never stop fighting for that better future. thank you, very much. god bless you. and god bless the united states of america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you. [applause] okay, i will take a few questions. >> thank you, thank you secretary panetta for talking to us. i am in the security studies program here at georgetown. i am taking
using a religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. so i think drones as an instrument they have had some advocacy in terms of precision, but it's like saying we can't allow u.s. f-16s to come and for instance. to run anti-terror operations when we can come the women were able to move the protect them. so drones are now, we do see them as productive at all. >> what general staff comes to you and said we need -- [inaudible] >> excuse me? you need to be a very big fire that committee wall, wouldn't you? >> john mccain. >> career on the same page now come the members of general staff on where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations, absolutely all of them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there's been a lot of drones strikes next door, so in any case, you know al qaeda -- the whole al qaeda list is pretty much through our cooperation, a joint after a night spent in this administration will agree to also. >> you talk about the process in afghanistan being afghan led. president karzai had this
of their race, color, religion, or gender. vawa encourages collaboration among law enforcement, judicial personnel, public and private sector providers to victims of domestic and sexual violence. it also works to increase public awareness. madam president, one in four women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. an estimated 1.3 million women are victims of sexual assault by an intimate partner every year. there are more than 18,000 cases in maryland of domestic abuse and 38 fatalities. that period of time has been the lowest number of domestic violence-related deaths on record for the state, but these numbers are still very much unacceptable. i am disappointed last year the house refused to take up legislation that we approved. it also refused to go to conference to work out differences between the two bills. i urge my colleagues to pass the legislation that is pending here and urge my colleagues in the house to quickly take up the senate bill and enact it into law. with that, madam president, i would suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk should
and pop really got religion now? >> i think the answer to that is no. january is seasonally a very good month, as halls been with the year-end reinvestment and pension contributions, has been a very good month for mutual funds. it's better than it was in the summer and autumn and winter. just last year. and so it's not the big pop that one would think you'd get. i, for one, think that's good. you know, when mutual fund investors pile into equities, it's usually a very negative sign for the market. so something like the dow going 14,000, i can contain my enthusiasm about that. it doesn't mean very much. >> and a lot of people have pointed out some of the records that we broke this month -- or i should say january, sort of were a reminder of the last time we set those records, which not too happy days were soon to follow, jack. >> well, yeah, you're right about that. it's even more dramatic if you go beyond the dow which has its advantages, and great limits. you go to the nasdaq, and that index is around 4,700 at its high in 2000. and now it's -- you tell me, 3,200 maybe. it's still fully
, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not have an up-to-date broadcast
are going to be the ones running this at the end. >> she is going to drug you what america's religion which is democracy and everyone in america loves democracy. on a grant that. i plead guilty to taking that. >> and i am right there with you but this is not about -- there is much more going on here to get anybody that knows the middle east knows that the borders were drawn around people that don't necessarily want to live together. we have seen this in israel, palestinians and jews do not want to live together. now, we could say let's have democracy and have a one state solution. joost not want a one-stop solution and palestinians do not want a one-stop solution. it's not about the democracy in palestine and israel and its about the democracy in iraq. we said was going to make democracy and cast the sunni is down. they were not. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, the government, the education system and that is what is going to have been anybody that thinks that when the takeover and syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions into the next stat
when i talk about freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. count during a violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not ha
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21